ERIC CLAPTON & CREAM
Before tackling this course, you should be comfortable with all the material from Unit 1 - Silly Beer

In this second unit we will start our deep exploration of the 5 pentatonic shapes. A lot of you may already know these 5 boxes, but we will make sure to cover them in great detail, exploring the tones within them, how to use them, how to find the root notes and a cool Clapton style lick with each shape. Check out the first video to get started!

Lesson 6: Pentatonic Shape 1

Let’s begin with our classic, pentatonic box 1. This time as we go through it we will really highlight all of the various tones within the shape. This is such an important part of learning this scale, and how we can then develop it later on down the line (and later in this course). Here is the scale shape, and at the very least, we need to know where those root notes are!

Am Pentatonic Box 1

Lick 1

Here is a cool Clapton style lick using shape 1 of the pentatonic. Notice how the lick ends on the 5th fret of the B string, which is the 5th degree of the scale. This is a very easy to listen to way to end a lick. It sounds resolved, but not as resolved as the root note.



Lesson 7: Pentatonic Shape 2

Let’s now look at pentatonic box 2. This time as we go through it we will really highlight all of the various tones within the shape. This is such an important part of learning this scale, and how we can then develop it later on down the line (and later in this course). Notice how the shape 1 and 2 back onto each other. This is important when we come to join these two shapes.

Am Pentatonic Box 2

Lick 2

Here is a cool Clapton style lick using shape 2 of the pentatonic. Notice how we are combining two notes at the same time here to get a more overdriven, sludgy sound, notorious of Clapton in Cream. The repetitive nature of it, along side the rhythm, make for an awesome blues tone!



Lesson 8: Pentatonic Shape 3

Let’s now look at pentatonic box 3. We will really highlight all of the various tones within the shape. This is such an important part of learning this scale, and how we can then develop it later on down the line (and later in this course). Notice again how the back of shape 2 is the front of shape 3. Linking the shapes like this in your mind is absolutely crucial!

Am Pentatonic Box 3

Lick 3

Here is a cool Clapton style lick using shape 3 of the pentatonic. This is a great lick using Clapton’s classic triplet feel hammer ons and pull offs. These are pretty quick, but if your hammer on and pull offs are ok, this isn’t as hard as it may at first seem! Notice we also start and end on the root note in this phrase!



Lesson 9: Pentatonic Shape 4

Let’s now look at pentatonic box 4. We will really highlight all of the various tones within the shape. This is such an important part of learning this scale, and how we can then develop it later on down the line (and later in this course). Notice again how the back of shape 3 is the front of shape 4. Linking the shapes like this in your mind is absolutely crucial!

Am Pentatonic Box 4

Lick 4

Here is a cool Clapton style lick using shape 4 of the pentatonic. Notice how this is the first lick that doesn’t come in on the first beat of the bar, giving it a totally different flavour to the rest of the licks! Loads of cool bends to apply here as well!



Lesson 10: Pentatonic Shape 5

Let’s now look at pentatonic box 5. We will really highlight all of the various tones within the shape. This is such an important part of learning this scale, and how we can then develop it later on down the line (and later in this course). Notice again how the back of shape 4 is the front of shape 5. Linking the shapes like this in your mind is absolutely crucial!

Am Pentatonic Box 5

Lick 5

Here is a cool Clapton style lick using shape 5 of the pentatonic. This is another great example of Clapton’s love of those cool little triplet licks. Notice how once again it ends on the 5th, which works well as the end of a phrase, as well as leaving it open for more notes! Check out the lick below.



Lesson 11: Blues Note Slides

We can now take all of the pentatonic scale shapes and put them together across the fretboard, using a really simple, but effective system! We will essentially slide from the 4th degree to the 5th degree, moving our position as we go. This works so well, and is so well used by Eric Clapton, because we are using the blues note to slide through.

The blues note is the “b5" degree of the scale. The note in between the 4th and 5th degree.



Ready to move on? Remember to check out every lesson in this unit first – then try the next unit...

Unit 3 - Clapton 12 Bar

In this section we take a break from the lead to look at a classic 12 bar style rhythm, up beat and hard! We look at the 12 bar structure, especially with quick blues tracks and build it up from the basic shuffle.