JIMMY PAGE
Before tackling this course, you should be comfortable with all the material from Adding the Full Scale

To complete our course we will be applying all of the full scale theory we have learnt to this extremely cool, and challenging, slow minor blues. Jimmy Page is truly the master of lead dynamics, and we really go to town on it in this solo!

Summary: Since You've Been Liking Me

This track really brings together everything we love about Jimmy Page's soloing. It has dynamics, quick licks, it's 'fidgety' and yet manages to find space, and of course it uses all of the scale shapes and bluesy ideas that we come to expect from Jimmy Page. We will not be focusing on learning the entire perfectly, It's just too difficult to get the timings exactly right. Instead, we will be learning each lick separately and you can take your favourites with you! Think of this track more as an example of how you can put all of the techniques together.

Lick 1-2: Cm Pentatonic

This solo is all in the key of C minor, and we are predominantly using the Pentatonic shape 1, 2 and full scale shape 1 & 2. The opening licks both use the Pentatonic shape 1, which is shown below. Don't forget about the 'twitchy' fingers that we talk about in the video... it really adds to the Jimmy Page effect!

Materials: The Tab

As we go further through the solo, you'll need to use the tab to nail each lick. In this lesson, we are looking at licks 1-2 (their positions are marked just above the tab). Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to really help you master those licks before moving on.

Lick 3: The full scale!

Lick 3 is the first time we use the full scale shape 1, alongside the blues scale shape 1. Remember to also dynamically really attack this lick at the beginning and then gradually soften the lick towards the end. The scale shapes you are using look like this:

Lick 4: Moving across the neck

Lick 4 is where we expand on the previous lick and move across to shape 2 and then shape 3! The key element to making this work is again in the dynamics. You want to start the lick softly, then as you hit shape 3, you hit the notes more firmly. Be sure to watch this in action in the video. Here are the scale shapes:

Materials: The Tab

As we go further through the solo, you'll need to use the tab to nail each lick. In this lesson, we are looking at licks 3-4 (their positions are marked just above the tab). Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to really help you master those licks before moving on.

Lick 5-6: Descending Lick

Lick 5 sees us working our way down the scales, Jimmy Page style! Be sure to focus on which shapes you are using for each part of this lick. You kick off in shape 2, then down to shape 1, as shown below. Once we get to lick 6 it's all about the aggression! Turn up the guitar and really attack those notes!

Materials: The Tab

As we go further through the solo, you'll need to use the tab to nail each lick. In this lesson, we are looking at licks 5-6 (their positions are marked just above the tab). Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to really help you master those licks before moving on.

Lick 7-8: Descending Lick

For the final two licks we use the same shapes as before, except now in a more bluesy fashion! After all the complicated, dynamic minor licks up to this point, lick 7 feels like a really bluesy release that allows one note to just sing! We then test your legato skill with the final lick before resolving to C.

Materials: The Tab

In this lesson, we are looking at lick 7-8 (the positions are marked just above the tab). Once you master them you'll be able to piece the entire solo together! Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to help.

Audio: Backing Track & Audio

When you are ready, the backing track and full solo are here to play along to. It is worth trying to play with just the backing track, as you will not be 'hiding' behind the recorded guitar part; it's all up to you to make it sound awesome!

Ready to move on? Remember to check out every lesson in this unit first – then try the next unit...

Getting The Tone

Jimmy Page was probably most famous for wielding his Gibson Les Paul, but there is more to it than that! He used Telecasters, a wide variety of amps including Marshall, Orange and many more. In this video Chris takes you through how we found his tone!