SLASH
Before tackling this course, you should be comfortable with all the material from Slash Licks & Scales

In the final teaching section of this course we take a look at a more melodic style Slash solo which makes full use of all the scales we have gone through in the previous section. We are playing in the key of C major and use a combination of the pentatonic and full scale shapes, as well as some really cool scale run ideas, to create this awesome solo!

Summary: "October Sleet"

This solo is a very different side of Slash's playing, and in comparison to the first solo almost seems like a different player! The solo is all about creating melody and very pleasing, major sounds. This type of solo woudl typically be used in the early part of the song (i.e. solo 1 and 2), where the first, more aggressive rock solo, would be used for the final solo! they just don't write songs like this anymore!! Have a good listen to the solo until you can hum the melody, and then move onto the next lesson.

LICK 1-2: Full scale Lick

The first two licks are based on the full scale in shape 4, which in the key of C major is on the 12th fret (as shown in the fretboard diagram below). These two licks are all about the melodies you can get from different types of bends and legato playing. Be sure to take your time to pitch the bends correctly, as they can sound pretty bad when not pitched well!

Materials: The Tab

As we go further through the solo, you'll need to use the tab to nail each lick. In this lesson, we are looking at lick 1-2 (their positions are marked just above the tab). Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to really help you master those licks before moving on.

LICK 3-4: Mastering The Bends!

Lick 3 is in exactly the same positon as lick 1-2, but then as we drop to lick 4 we move into the full scale shape 1 and 2 (as shown below). This lick has so many full tone bends, some of which go up and down, others that go up and stop and others that 'double' bend! All in all you've got a challenging lick to pitch, so we'd highly recommend taking your time with it. This is a great lick to apply to your improvising, so remember that it's based mainly around shape 1 of the full scale.

Materials: The Tab

In this lesson, we are looking at licks 3-4 (their positions are marked just above the tab). Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to really help you master those licks before moving on.

Lick 5: Descending major scale

Lick 5 is by far the longest lick in the track, and it's a great example of how you can melodically descend through a scale. We kick off the lick back in shape 4 of the full scale, but quickly start moving down through shape 3, 2 and finally 1. At the end of the lick we revert to our classic pentatonic sounds finishing on the major root note of C. The scale shapes are shown here:

Materials: The Tab

In this lesson, we are looking at lick 5 (their positions are marked just above the tab). Use the slow down and looping function of the tab viewer to really help you master those licks before moving on.

Lick 6: Quick jumps!

The final lick is a quick lick that jumps between shape 3 of the full scale and shape 4 (Shown on the fretboard below). What we really love about this lick is that it has a rapid down/up motion to it. You do a little lick that descends in a low part of a scale, followed by a quick jump to a much higher lick. The effect this has is really cool, and one which you should try to adopt in your own improvising. Try playing a low lick followed by jumping to a very high one... the effect could blow the listeners away if down well!

Materials: The Tab

In this lesson, we are looking at lick 5 (the positions are marked just above the tab). Once you master them you'll be able to piece the entire solo together! Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to help.

Audio: Backing Track & Audio

When you are ready, the backing track and full solo are here to play along to. It is worth trying to play with just the backing track, as you will not be 'hiding' behind the recorded guitar part; it's all up to you to make it sound awesome!

Ready to move on? Remember to check out every lesson in this unit first – then try the next unit...

Getting The Tone

Chris takes you through all the guitars, amps and pedals we used to get an accurate Slash tone. Yes, tone is generally in the fingers, but there is only so much you can do without some of these key bits of gear!